Programming

How to Make Asynchronous Calls in Redux Without Middlewares

How to Make Asynchronous Calls in Redux Without Middlewares

Redux has greatly helped in reducing the complexities of state management. Its one way data flow is easier to reason about and it also provides a powerful mechanism to include middlewares which can be chained together to do our biding. One of the most common use case for the middleware is to make async calls in the application. Different middlewares like redux-thunk, redux-sagas, redux-observable, etc are a few examples. All of these come with their own learning curve and are best suited for tackling different scenarios.

But what if our use-case is simple enough and we don’t want to have the added complexities that implementing a middleware brings? Can we somehow implement the most common use-case of making async API calls using only redux and javascript?

Understanding Node.js Async Flows: Parallel, Serial, Waterfall and Queues

Understanding Node.js Async Flows: Parallel, Serial, Waterfall and Queues

Promises in Javascript has been around since a long time now. It helped solve the problem of callback hell. But as soon as the requirements get complicated with control flows, promises start getting unmanageable and harder to work with.

This is where async flows come to the rescue. In this blog, lets talk about the various async flows used frequently over raw promises and callbacks.

Creating GraphQL APIs Using Elixir Phoenix and Absinthe

Creating GraphQL APIs Using Elixir Phoenix and Absinthe

GraphQL is a new hype in the Field of API technologies. We have been constructing and using REST API's for quite some time now and started hearing about GraphQL recently. GraphQL is usually described as a frontend-directed API technology as it allows front-end developers to request data in a more simpler way than ever before. The objective of this query language is to formulate client applications formed on an instinctive and adjustable format, for portraying their data prerequisites as well as interactions.

The Phoenix Framework is running on Elixir, which is built on top of Erlang. Elixir core strength is scaling and concurrency. Phoenix is a powerful and productive web framework that does not compromise speed and maintainability. Phoenix comes in with built-in support for web sockets, enabling you to build real-time apps.

In this blog we will explore how to build GraphQL APis for Phoenix/Elixir using Absinthe.